3 results for author: Yonce Jones


Who has tickets to your life?

As I rode the subway home yesterday holding me Metro card — my ticket — in my hand, I realized that if you think about your life as a performance, you are in control of who (and what) gets tickets to this priceless event. It's up to me—and to you—to be mindful in deciding who we allow front row seats in our lives. My health is the most important thing in my life. Without good health, physical and mental, I wouldn't be able to live my life — to enjoy this one performance — to the fullest. But in the busyness of life, it's easy to let our priorities slide. Sometimes we forget to manage our mental health or we put it off, acting as if ...

Diversity & Inclusion: The Harsh Reality

I recently hosted a group and the topic was gender identity and roles. I must admit while this topic comes easy for me, as I was forced through my life experiences to realize the harsh reality that many people still believe that transgender people should not be seen or heard. Granted, a few gentleman gave me great respect but the facial expressions about the topic could be read across the room. About half of the group here macho men and the other half LGBTQ people. The face-off started when I asked, "Has anyone ever been called something that was not their name?" Then I went around to each person and asked them to tell me a hurtful name that they ...

A “Gender Revolution” at Harlem United

As a trans woman, I face a variety of issues daily. The most common is getting people to recognize that I am a lady and not a man. Some people feel that because I was born a man, I am a man. In fact, they will argue with me to the point that I feel nothing I say will change their mind. This is a dangerous way of thinking because it often leads to disrespect and discrimination, like being told what bathroom I am allowed to use. When I was asked to facilitate a group of clients in Harlem United's advocacy program to watch the documentary, Gender Revolution: A Journey with Katie Couric, immediately I felt the pressure. Not to be a good facilitator—I ...